Published by Misasa Medical Center, Okayama University Medical School
Published by Misasa Medical Center, Okayama University Medical School

<Formerly known as>
岡大三朝分院研究報告 (63号-72号) 環境病態研報告 (57号-62号)
岡山大学温泉研究所報告 (5号-56号) 放射能泉研究所報告 (1号-4号)

<Availability>
Some items are not available because of decision by its author or publisher.

溫泉地の井戸水中並びに土壌に附着しているCl-,SO(4)(2-)について(第9報) 島根縣鷺の湯溫泉

Umemoto, Shunji
Tanaka, Shigeo
Abstract
At Saginoyu Hot Springs same experiments as those described in previous reports were carried out. Water temperature of Springs is about 50℃. and main constituents dissolved in spring water are calcium sulfate and sodium chloride, its total salt content being 1.5g./ℓ.. Experimental results obtained are shown in the annexed table and map. The results obtained may be discussed in two ways: First, the area marked with ※ is regarded as the spring zone, and a comparison is made by Cochran and Cox's method between this zone and the outside area as to the average contents of chloride and sulfate in well Water, the average water temperatures of well water and the average amounts of chloride and sulfate fixed to soil. The differences in averages of the chloride and sulfate content of well water are significant, while that in average water temperatures is not significant. The differences in the average amounts of chloride and sulfate fixed to soil are not significant. However, the difference in the average amounts of chloride fixed to soi1 is nearly same as that for the 5 % level, and it is seen that the average amount of chloride fixed to soil tends to be higher in the spring zone than in the outside area. Second, the area marked with t is regarded as the spring zone, and a comparison is made in the same way as the above. The differences in the averages of the chloride and sulfate contents and water temperatures of well waters, all being higher in the spring zone, are significant. The differences in average amounts of chloride and Sdlfate fixed to soil are not significant. However, since these differences are nearly same as that for the 5 % level, the average amounts of chloride and sulfate fixed to soil tend to be higher in the spring zone than in the outside area. As the existence of sources which would supply the chloride, sulfate and heat to the water and soil is impossible, the above differences may be due to effects of thermal springs. Since the spring zone may be defined as the zone effected by mineral springs, it is more appropriate to follow the second of the above two ways than to follow the first, and to regard the area marked with t as the spring zone. Then, the differences between the spring zone and the outside area are revealed more remarkably than otherwise. It is an interesing fact that the samples Nos. 3-6, though collected from the spots very near to the springs, do not belong to the spring zone.
Note
正誤表あり
ISSN
0369-7142
NCID
AN00032853