JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54590
FullText URL 70_5_331.pdf
Author Iida, Atsuyoshi| Nosaka, Nobuyuki| Yumoto, Tetsuya| Knaup, Emily| Naito, Hiromichi| Nishiyama, Chihiro| Yamakawa, Yasuaki| Tsukahara, Kohei| Terado, Michihisa| Sato, Keiji| Ugawa, Toyomu| Nakao, Atsunori|
Abstract In recent years, it has become evident that molecular hydrogen is a particularyl effective treatment for various disease models such as ischemia-reperfusion injury; as a result, research on hydrogen has progressed rapidly. Hydrogen has been shown to be effective not only through intake as a gas, but also as a liquid medication taken orally, intravenously, or locally. Hydrogenʼs effectiveness is thus multifaceted. Herein we review the recent research on hydrogen-rich water, and we examine the possibilities for its clinical application. Now that hydrogen is in the limelight as a gaseous signaling molecule due to its potential ability to inhibit oxidative stress signaling, new research developments are highly anticipated.
Keywords hydrogen antioxidant effect medical gas gaseous signaling molecule clinical tests
Amo Type Review
Published Date 2016-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume70
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 331
End Page 337
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2016 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 27777424
Web of Sience KeyUT 000388098700001
Title Alternative Okayama University Hospital DMAT activity report for the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake
FullText URL 128_133.pdf
Author Terado, Michihisa| Yamanouchi, Hideo| Nakura, Hironori| Nakao, Atsunori|
Publication Title Journal of Okayama Medical Association
Published Date 2016-08-01
Volume volume128
Issue issue2
Start Page 133
End Page 139
ISSN 0030-1558
Related Url isVersionOf https://doi.org/10.4044/joma.128.133
language 日本語
Copyright Holders Copyright (c) 2016 岡山医学会
File Version publisher
DOI 10.4044/joma.128.133
NAID 130005262643
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53021
FullText URL 68_6_323.pdf
Author Hirayama, Takahiro| Nagano, Osamu| Shiba, Naoki| Yumoto, Tetsuya| Sato, Keiji| Terado, Michihisa| Ugawa, Toyomu| Ichiba, Shingo| Ujike, Yoshihito|
Abstract In adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), stroke volume (SV) and mean lung pressure (PLung) are important for lung protection. We measured the airway pressure at the Y-piece and the lung pressure during HFOV using a lung model and HFOV ventilators for adults (R100 and 3100B). The lung model was made of a 20-liter, airtight rigid plastic container (adiabatic compliance: 19.3ml/cmH<sub>2</sub>O) with or without a resistor (20cmH<sub>2</sub>O/l/sec). The ventilator settings were as follows: mean airway pressure (MAP), 30cmH2O;frequency, 5-15Hz (every 1Hz);airway pressure amplitude (AMP), maximum;and % of inspiratory time (IT), 50% for R100, 33% or 50% for 3100B. The measurements were also performed with an AMP of 2/3 or 1/3 maximum at 5, 10 and 15Hz. The PLung and the measured MAP were not consistently identical to the setting MAP in either ventilator, and decreasing IT decreased the PLung in 3100B. In conclusion, we must pay attention to the possible discrepancy between the PLung and the setting MAP during adult HFOV.
Keywords HFOV mean lung pressure mean airway pressure
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2014-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume68
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 323
End Page 329
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2014 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 25519026
Web of Sience KeyUT 000346882200002
Related Url http://ousar.lib.okayama-u.ac.jp/metadata/53132
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/47266
FullText URL 65_6_403.pdf
Author Waseda, Koichi| Tanimoto, Yasushi| Ichiba, Shingo| Miyahara, Nobuaki| Murakami, Toshi| Ochi, Nobuaki| Terado, Michihisa| Nagano, Osamu| Maeda, Yoshinobu| Kanehiro, Arihiko| Ujike, Yoshihito| Tanimoto, Mitsune|
Abstract Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a disease with a poor prognosis, and a key factor that limits long-term survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We here report a case of a 31-year woman with acute lymphatic leukemia, which was treated by chemotherapy and HSCT, and consequently developed BO 2 years after HSCT. A non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection occurred and showed gradual exacerbation. She started taking anti-mycobacterial drugs, but lost appetite, felt tired and finally lost consciousness one month after beginning medication. Arterial blood gas revealed marked hypercapnia. Using extracorporeal life support (ECLS), the carbon dioxide concentration was reduced and her consciousness recovered. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which ECLS was successfully used for hypercapnia in a patient with BO.
Keywords extracorporeal life support hypercapnia bronchiolitis obliterans noninvasive positive pressure ventilation
Amo Type Case Report
Published Date 2011-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume65
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 403
End Page 406
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2011 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 22189481
Web of Sience KeyUT 000298516900007
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/30963
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Terado, Michihisa| Ichiba, Shingo| Nagano, Osamu| Ujike, Yoshihito|
Abstract <p>In modern emergency and critical care, physicians tend to choose the mode of mechanical ventilation based on spontaneous breathing for the purpose of promoting discharge of pulmonary secretion and preventing atelectasis in patients with acute respiratory insufficiency. However, we often observe &#34;differences in recovery&#34; among patients treated using the same PSV settings beyond &#34;differences in individual characteristics.&#34; We evaluated the Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV) mode aiming to certify the difference among 7 representative mechanical ventilators using the Active Servo Lung 5000 (ASL5000) respiratory simulation system. The following parameters were measured: The time delay that resulted in the lowest inspiratory pressure from the point at which the ventilator recognized spontaneous breathing (TD), the lowest inspiratory airway pressure (cmH2O) generated prior to the initiation of PSV (DeltaPaw), the work of breathing while triggering required to achieve the lowest inspiratory negative pressure from the beginning of inspiratory support (WOBtrig), and the inspiratory work of breathing (WOBi). The mean TD of the Puritan-Bennett type 840 (PB840) was signifi cantly shorter than those of other ventilators (p0.01). The WOBtrig of the PB840 was significantly lower than those of others (p0.01). However, the WOBi values of the Servo-I and T-Bird were greater than the others, with the Evita series showing the smallest WOBi of the 7 ventilators tested. According to this simulation study using ASL 5000, we concluded that PB840 was the most rapid response ventilator, but the Evita series was the gentlest mechanical ventilator among 7 ventilators from the standpoint of the total work of breathing during the inspiration phase in the setting of PSV.</p>
Keywords work of breathing pressure support ventilation mechanical ventilation active servo lung (ASL5000)
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2008-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume62
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 127
End Page 133
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 18464889
Web of Sience KeyUT 000255297600009
Author Terado, Michihisa|
Published Date 2008-03-25
Publication Title
Content Type Thesis or Dissertation