JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32867
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Furusawa, Kazunari| Sugiyama, Hiroyuki| Ikeda, Atsushi| Tokuhiro, Akihiro| Koyoshi, Hiroko| Takahashi, Masanori| Tajima, Fumihiro|
Abstract The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between bowel maneuvers and autonomic dysreflexia (AD) in patients with cervical spinal cord injuries (CSCI). Fifteen consecutive, clinically stable patients with CSCI participated. We evaluated changes in blood pressure (BP), pulse rate (PR) and classic symptoms of AD before, during and after a bowel program involving the manual removal of stool in lateral recumbency. The insertion of rectal medication induced a significant increase in systolic BP, which persisted during additional digital rectal stimulation. Furthermore, the manual removal of stool induced AD, with maximal increases of systolic BP (169.1(+-)19.5 mmHg, mean(+-)SD). However, the insertion of a finger into the anus after the end of stool flow did not cause a further increase in systolic BP. Systolic BP recovered to pre-program values within 5 min after defecation. Our study demonstrated that the combined effects of rectal and/or anal sphincter distension and uninhibited rectal contraction in response to the manual removal of stool might induce AD. We recommend avoiding, if at all possible, the manual removal of stool in order to prevent AD in patients with CSCI.
Keywords spinal cord injury autonomic dysrefl exia blood pressure bowel program
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2007-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume61
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 221
End Page 227
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 17726511
Web of Science KeyUT 000248957100006
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32851
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Shintani, Mai| Senda, Masuo| Takayanagi, Tomoko| Katayama, Yoshimi| Furusawa, Kazunari| Okutani, Tamami| Kataoka, Masaki| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract <p>To assess the effects of service dogs on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), we conducted a survey of 10 service dog owners using SF-36v2 (Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short-Form Health Survey Version 2.0) and compared it with a matched control group of people with physical disabilities who did not have service dogs but were eligible for one. The scores for mental health and role emotional of service dog owners were relatively high, and their mental component summary was higher than the general population norm. These results indicate that service dogs affect the mentality of their owners. The comparison with the control group indicated that service dogs alleviate the mental burden of daily activities, and subjectively improved the physical functioning of their owners. This study showed that service dogs have positive functional and mental effects on their disabled owners.</p>
Keywords service dog HRQOL SF-36v2 people with physical disability
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 109
End Page 113
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20424665
Web of Science KeyUT 000276996900004