JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/56246
FullText URL 72_5_487.pdf
Author Hamasaki, Ichiro| Shibata, Kiyo| Shimizu, Takehiro| Morisawa, Shin| Toshima, Shinji| Miyata, Manabu| Furuse, Takashi| Hasebe, Satoshi| Ohtsuki, Hiroshi| Morizane, Yuki| Shiraga, Fumio|
Abstract We investigated variances in the stability and amount of postoperative exodrift among age groups of intermittent exotropia (XPT) patients who underwent unilateral lateral rectus muscle recession and medial rectus muscle resection. We analyzed the cases of 110 consecutive patients who underwent the surgery in 2004-2011, dividing the patients into groups by their age at surgery: <10, 10-19, and ≥20 years. We performed a regression analysis (dependent variable: postoperative exodrift (°); independent variable: number of days post-surgery) using the formula of curve lines. When the tangent line slope was = 0.01 (°/days) for each group, we defined the numbers of days until alignment became stable as the ‘stable days.’ We evaluated the between-group differences in the amount of exodrift calculated for the stable days. The coefficients and coefficients of determination for the fitting curves were: <10 year group: f(x)=12.2 (1−e−0.0183x) (r2=0.588, p<0.05); 10-19 year group: f(x)=10.0 (1−e−0.0178x) (r2=0.453, p<0.05); ≥20 year group: f(x)=3.40 (1−e−0.0382x) (r2=0.217, p<0.05). There were 389 , 388, and 153 stable days, and the estimated postoperative exodrift with long-term follow-up was 11.5±3.7°, 9.3±4.4°, and 4.1±3.6° for the < 10 year, 10-19 year, and ≥ 20 year groups, respectively (≥20 year vs. other 2 groups, p<0.05). Longer periods and more postoperative exodrift were associated with younger age at surgery. The postoperative evaluation was approx. ≥ 1 year post-surgery in patients aged < 20. These findings may contribute to evaluating XPT’s success rate and prognoses.
Keywords intermittent exotropia postoperative exodrift recession resection procedure strabismus surgery
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2018-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume72
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 487
End Page 492
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2018 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 30369605
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54591
FullText URL 70_5_339.pdf
Author Miyata, Manabu| Nakahara, Ryuichi| Hamasaki, Ichiro| Hasebe, Satoshi| Furuse, Takashi| Ohtsuki, Hiroshi|
Abstract Although a 0.3 Bangerter filter, which reduces visual acuity, is frequently used for treating moderate amblyopia, the effects on gross stereopsis are not well known. This study quantitatively evaluated whether gross stereopsis is degraded by a Bangerter filter. Seven healthy subjects (median age: 29 years) participated in this psychophysical study. Targets with crossed disparities of 1°, 2°, 3°, 4°, and 5° were randomly presented on a three-dimensional television display. The subjects indicated the point at which the targets popped out from the television screen (matching method). The distance from the screen to the point was defined as the degree of stereopsis. This experiment was performed with and without a 0.3 Bangerter filter. The corrected monocular visual acuities were decreased to about 20/63 by the filter in all subjects. No significant difference was observed for any of the disparities (1°-5°), between the degree of stereopsis visualized with and without filters for either the dominant or the non-dominant eye. The degree of stereopsis was not degraded by the reduced visual acuity induced by the use of 0.3 Bangerter filters. In this regard, the use of 0.3 Bangerter filters may be considered safer than occlusion eye patches for the patients with normal binocular vision.
Keywords amblyopia Bangerter filter binocular vision stereopsis
Amo Type Original Articles
Published Date 2016-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume70
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 339
End Page 344
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2016 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 27777425
Web of Sience KeyUT 000388098700002