JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/56376
FullText URL 72_6_583.pdf
Author Park, Se-Jin| Jeong, Hwa-Jae| Shin, Hun-Kyu| Park, Jai Hyung| Lee, Jaewook| Cho, Yongun| Lee, Seok Won| Murase, Tsuyoshi| Ikemoto, Sumika| Sugamoto, Kazuomi| Kim, Eugene|
Abstract We retrospectively evaluated the altered biomechanics of the talus in 15 adult patients (7 males, 8 females) with chronic lateral ankle instability when the ankle joint moved actively from full dorsiflexion to full plantarflexion under a non-weight bearing condition. CT images were taken for the unstable ankle and the contralateral normal (control) ankle. Three-dimensional surface models of both ankle joints were reconstructed from the CT data, and we used a computer simulation program to compare both ankle motions of inversion/eversion in the coronal plane, plantarflexion/dorsiflexion in the sagittal plane, and internal rotation/external rotation in the axial plane. This evaluation method provides in vivo, dynamic, and 3D results of ankle motion. In the ankles with chronic lateral instability and the controls, the average talar rotational movement of inversion (+)/eversion (−) was 19.0° and 15.5° and the internal rotation (+)/external rotation (−) was 30.4° and 20.7°, respectively. Paired t-tests revealed significant differences in the amount of inversion (+)/eversion (−) (p=0.012) and internal rotation (+)/external rotation (−) (p<0.001) between unstable and normal ankle joints. The difference of mean rotational movement in internal rotation (9.7°) was greater than that of inversion (3.5°). Rotational instability should be considered when evaluating chronic lateral ankle instability.
Keywords three-dimensional motion analysis chronic lateral ankle instability talus ankle joint
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2018-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume72
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 583
End Page 589
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2018 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 30573913
NAID 120006545161
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54984
FullText URL 71_2_151.pdf
Author Kim, Eugene| Park, Jai Hyung| Han, Byeong-Ryong| Park, Hee Jin| Lee, So Yeon| Murase, Tsuyoshi| Sugamoto, Kazuomi| Ikemoto, Sumika| Park, Se-Jin|
Abstract The three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the scapula were analyzed in vivo in 10 patients with scapular and 10 patients with clavicular fracture. Both the injured shoulder and normal contralateral shoulder were evaluated by computed tomography in the neutral and fully elevated positions. 3D rotational and translational movements of the scapula relative to the thorax during arm elevation were analyzed. A computer simulation program was used to compare rotational elevation/depression in the coronal plane, anterior/posterior tilting in the sagittal plane and protraction/retraction in the axial plane between the normal and affected sides. Anterior/posterior translational movement along the X-axis, upward/downward movement along the Y-axis, and lateral/medial movement along the Z-axis in the Euler space during forward elevation were also compared. In scapular fracture, rotational elevation of the scapula decreased in the coronal plane and posterior tilting of the scapula increased in the sagittal plane. Anterior and superior translation were higher in scapular fracture than in the corresponding normal sides. However, no significant abnormal rotational and translational kinematic changes were observed during elevation in clavicular fracture. In vivo 3D computerized motion analysis was useful for evaluating scapular dyskinesis. Scapular fracture can cause scapular dyskinesis, but not all clavicular fractures alter scapular motion biomechanics.
Keywords 3-dimensional motion analysis scapular dyskinesis fracture scapula clavicle
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2017-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 151
End Page 159
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 28420897
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/40509
FullText URL 64_5_331.pdf
Author Park, Se-Jin| Jung, Young-Bok| Jeong, Hwa Jae| Shin, Hun-Kyu| Jung, Ho-Joong| Lim, Jong-Jun| Yoon, Ji-Woong| Kim, Eugene|
Abstract Among patients that underwent total knee arthroplasty from June, 1990 to January, 1999, 61 cases (44 patients) that could be followed for more than 10 years were included in this study. The patients were divided into a patellar retention group and a patellar resurfacing group, and were compared with regard to their clinical and radiological outcomes. In patients undergoing primary TKA, a selective patellar resurfacing protocol was used. The indications for patellar retention were a small patella, nearly normal articular cartilage, minimal preoperative patellofemoral pain, poor patellar bone quality, and young patient age. When patellar retention was performed, osteophytes of the patella were removed and marginal electrocauterization was carried out. There were 25 cases (20 patients) in the patellar retention group and 36 cases (29 patients) in the patellar resurfacing group. The mean follow-up period was 140.7 months in the patellar retention group and 149.0 months in the patellar resurfacing group. The selective patellar resurfacing with total knee arthroplasty had a favorable outcome;there were a significant difference noted between the 2 groups in the functional scores, which showed better outcomes in the patellar resurfacing group than in the patellar retention group.
Keywords total knee arthroplasty (TKA) selective patellar resurfacing patellar retention patellar resurfacing
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 331
End Page 338
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2010 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20975767
Web of Sience KeyUT 000283563300009