Author Iwasaki, Yuka| Nishiuchi, Rituo| Aoe, Michinori| Takahashi, Takahide| Watanabe, Hirokazu| Tokorotani, Chiho| Kikkawa, Kiyoshi| Shimada, Akira|
Published Date 2017-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54829
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53562
FullText URL 69_4_255.pdf
Author Miyahara, Hiroyuki| Maruyama, Hidehiko| Kanazawa, Akane| Iwasaki, Yuka| Shigemitsu, Yusuke| Watanabe, Hirokazu| Tokorodani, Chiho| Miyazawa, Mari| Nishiuchi, Ritsuo| Kikkawa, Kiyoshi|
Abstract Since the introduction of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in 2007, invasive pneumococcal disease has declined, but the incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A has risen worldwide. The present study examined changes in the features of invasive pneumococcal disease since the introduction of the PCV7 in Kochi, Japan. Pediatric cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were investigated before and after vaccine introduction (January 2008 to December 2013). Cases of invasive pneumococcal disease tended to decrease after PCV7 introduction. In addition, before introduction of the vaccine, most serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease were those included in the vaccine. However, after the introduction, we found cases infected by serotypes not covered by vaccine. Penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae was the predominant serotype causing invasive pneumococcal disease before introduction of the PCV7, and the susceptibility of this serotype to antibiotics improved after vaccine introduction. Serotype isolates identified after vaccine introduction were also relatively susceptible to antibiotic therapy, but decreased susceptibility is expected.
Keywords seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD)
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2015-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume69
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 255
End Page 260
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2015 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 26289917
Web of Sience KeyUT 000365519100009
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53337
FullText URL 69_2_87.pdf
Author Murayama, Hidehiko| Nakata, Yusei| Kanazawa, Akane| Watanabe, Hirokazu| Shigemitsu, Yusuke| Iwasaki, Yuka| Tokorodani, Chiho| Miyazawa, Mari| Nishiuchi, Ritsuo| Kikkawa, Kiyoshi|
Abstract Ventriculoperitoneal shunts (VPSs) are used for the treatment of hydrocephalus. Here we analyzed the outcomes of VPS placements in 24 infants to determine the risk factors for shunt failure. The infants had undergone the initial VPS operation in our hospital between March 2005 and December 2013. They were observed until the end of January 2014. We obtained Kaplan-Meier curves and performed a multivariate Cox regression analysis of shunt failure. Of the 24 cases, the median (range) values for gestational age, birth weight, and birth head circumference (HC) were 37 (27-39) wks, 2,736 (686-3,788) g, and 35.3 (23.0-45.3) cm, respectively. The total number of shunt procedures was 45. Shunt failure rates were 0.51/shunt and 0.0053/shunt/year. Shunt infection rates were 0.13/shunt and 0.0014/shunt/year. The Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed an increased risk for shunt failure in infants <1 month old or in the HC >90オtile. The Cox regression analysis yielded hazard ratios (HRs) of 2.93 (95オ confidence interval (CI), 0.96-10.95, p=0.059) for age <1 month, and 4.46 (95オCI:1.20-28.91,p=0.023) for the HC >90オtile. The multivariate Cox regression analysis showed adjusted HRs of 17.56 (95オCI:2.69-202.8, p=0.001) for age <1 month, and 2.95 (95オCI:0.52-24.84, p=0.228) for the HC >90オtile. Our findings thus revealed that the risk factors for shunt failure in infants include age <1 month at the initial VPS placement.
Keywords head circumference shunt failure shunt infection ventriculoperitoneal shunt
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2015-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume69
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 87
End Page 93
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2015 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 25899630
Web of Sience KeyUT 000353181700003