JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32857
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Wang, Jichun| Matsuoka, Hiroyuki| Hirai, Makoto| Mu, Ling| Yang, Liandi| Luo, Enjie|
Abstract <p>In Liaoning Province in northeastern China, we found a G6PD-deficient patient at the age of 3. By the classification of the World Health Organization, this patient was categorized as class I (very severe G6PD deficiency). When we investigated the G6PD gene of the patient, we found that he had a replacement of G to A at nucleotide 1339. As a result, the amino acid at position 447 should change from Gly to Arg. This replacement is known as G6PD Santiago de Cuba, because it was first discovered in a Cuban boy who showed heavy chronic anemia. Today, 28 G6PD variants have been reported in the Chinese population, and all are categorized as class II (severe deficiency) or class III (mild deficiency);in class II or III deficiency, anemia is not present in daily life, but hemolytic attack can occur when the carrier ingests certain oxidative medicines or foods. This is the first report of a G6PD-deficient Chinese patient in the category of class I. We intended to find other G6PD-deficient cases in northeastern China and tested several hundred blood samples, but no cases of G6PD deficiency were found (0/414). In central China, where falciparum malaria was endemic from the 1950s to 1970s, we found two G6PD-deficient cases (2/27) and the other members from their families whose variant type was G6PD Kaiping (1388GT), which is a common variant in the Chinese population.</p>
Keywords hemolytic anemia Chinese glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase G6PD Santiago de Cuba malaria
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 49
End Page 54
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20200584
Web of Sience KeyUT 000274868300007
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/30966
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Wang, Jichun| Luo, Enjie| Hirai, Makoto| Arai, Meiji| Abdul Manand, Encik Abdul Salim| Isa, Zaleha Mohamed| Hidayah, Noor Ishak| Matsuoka, Hiroyuki|
Abstract <p>The Malaysian people consist of several ethnic groups including the Malay, the Chinese, the Indian and the Orang Asli (aboriginal Malaysians). We collected blood samples from outpatients of 2 hospitals in the State of Selangor and identified 27 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient subjects among these ethnic groups. In the Malay, G6PD Viangchan (871G&#65310;A, 1311C&#65310;T, IVS11 nt93T&#65310;C) and G6PD Mahidol (487G&#65310;A) types, which are common in Cambodia and Myanmar, respectively, were detected. The Malay also had both subtypes of G6PD Mediterranean:the Mediterranean subtype (563C&#65310;T, 1311C&#65310;T, IVS11 nt93T&#65310;C) and the Indo-Pakistan subtype (563C&#65310;T, 1311C, IVS11 nt93T). In Malaysians of Chinese background, G6PD Kaiping (1388G&#65310;A), G6PD Canton (1376G&#65310;T) and G6PD Gaohe (95A&#65310;G), which are common in China, were detected. Indian Malaysians possessed G6PD Mediterranean (Indo-Pakistan subtype) and G6PD Namoru (208T&#65310;C), a few cases of which had been reported in Vanuatu and many in India. Our findings indicate that G6PD Namoru occurs in India and flows to Malaysia up to Vanuatu. We also discovered 5 G6PD-deficient cases with 2 nucleotide substitutions of 1311C&#65310;T and IVS11 nt93T&#65310;C, but without amino-acid substitution in the G6PD molecule. These results indicate that the Malaysian people have incorporated many ancestors in terms of G6PD variants.</p>
Keywords Aborigine Chinese glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase Indian Malay
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2008-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume62
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 327
End Page 332
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 18985093
Web of Sience KeyUT 000260391300007