Author Oku, Hachiro| Oki, Kazuo| Shiraishi, Tomonori| Sato, Kenji| Ouchi, Seiji|
Published Date 1979
Publication Title 岡山大学農学部学術報告
Volume volume54
Issue issue1
Content Type Departmental Bulletin Paper
Author Inaba, Hideo| Sato, Kenji|
Published Date 1994-12-25
Publication Title 日本機械学會論文集 B編
Volume volume60
Issue issue580
Content Type Journal Article
Author Inaba, Hideo| Sato, Kenji|
Published Date 1996-01-25
Publication Title 日本機械学會論文集 B編
Volume volume62
Issue issue593
Content Type Journal Article
Author Inaba, Hideo| Sato, Kenji|
Published Date 1996-10-25
Publication Title 日本機械学會論文集 B編
Volume volume62
Issue issue602
Content Type Journal Article
Author Inaba, Hideo| Sato, Kenji|
Published Date 1997-03-25
Publication Title 日本機械学會論文集 B編
Volume volume63
Issue issue607
Content Type Journal Article
Author Inaba, Hideo| Sato, Kenji|
Published Date 1997-03-25
Publication Title 日本機械学會論文集 B編
Volume volume63
Issue issue607
Content Type Journal Article
Author 佐藤 健治|
Published Date 2000-06-30
Publication Title
Content Type Thesis or Dissertation
Author Inaba, Hideo| Haruki, Naoto| Nakata, Toru| Horibe, Akihiko| Furumoto, Naoyuki| Sato, Kenji|
Published Date 2002-02-25
Publication Title 日本機械学會論文集 B編
Volume volume68
Issue issue666
Content Type Journal Article
Author Haruki, Naoto| Inaba, Hideo| Horibe, Akihiko| Tanaka, Shinji| Nakata, Toru| Sato, Kenji|
Published Date 2005-02
Publication Title 日本機械学會論文集 B編
Volume volume71
Issue issue702
Content Type Journal Article
Author Nishie, Hiroyuki| Mizobuchi, Satoshi| Matsusaki, Takashi| Miyake, Asako| Kaku, Ryuji| Ishikawa, Shinichi| Sato, Kenji| Matsumi, Masaki| Kiyoshi, Morita|
Published Date 2007-05-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume119
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53021
FullText URL 68_6_323.pdf
Author Hirayama, Takahiro| Nagano, Osamu| Shiba, Naoki| Yumoto, Tetsuya| Sato, Keiji| Terado, Michihisa| Ugawa, Toyomu| Ichiba, Shingo| Ujike, Yoshihito|
Abstract In adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), stroke volume (SV) and mean lung pressure (PLung) are important for lung protection. We measured the airway pressure at the Y-piece and the lung pressure during HFOV using a lung model and HFOV ventilators for adults (R100 and 3100B). The lung model was made of a 20-liter, airtight rigid plastic container (adiabatic compliance: 19.3ml/cmH<sub>2</sub>O) with or without a resistor (20cmH<sub>2</sub>O/l/sec). The ventilator settings were as follows: mean airway pressure (MAP), 30cmH2O;frequency, 5-15Hz (every 1Hz);airway pressure amplitude (AMP), maximum;and % of inspiratory time (IT), 50% for R100, 33% or 50% for 3100B. The measurements were also performed with an AMP of 2/3 or 1/3 maximum at 5, 10 and 15Hz. The PLung and the measured MAP were not consistently identical to the setting MAP in either ventilator, and decreasing IT decreased the PLung in 3100B. In conclusion, we must pay attention to the possible discrepancy between the PLung and the setting MAP during adult HFOV.
Keywords HFOV mean lung pressure mean airway pressure
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2014-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume68
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 323
End Page 329
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2014 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 25519026
Web of Sience KeyUT 000346882200002
Related Url http://ousar.lib.okayama-u.ac.jp/metadata/53132
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53023
FullText URL 68_6_339.pdf
Author Nishie, Hiroyuki| Mizobuchi, Satoshi| Suzuki, Etsuji| Sato, Kenji| Toda, Yuichiro| Matsuoka, Junji| Morimatsu, Hiroshi|
Abstract The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between Japanese individualsʼ interest in living wills and their preferred end-of-life care and death locations. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,000 individuals aged ァ50 to measure these 2 factors. We examined the associations between the respondentsʼ characteristics and their preferred care and death locations by using multinomial logistic regression models. The response rate was 74%. Home was the most frequently preferred place for end-of-life care (64%), and a palliative care unit (PCU) was the most commonly preferred place to die (51%). Living will interest was associated with a preference for care (odds ratio [OR] 4.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95-12.1) and death (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.70-4.47) in a PCU rather than a hospital, but it was not associated with the choice between receiving care or dying at home instead of a hospital. We must consider why Japanese people think home death is impracticable. The Japanese palliative care system should be expanded to meet patientsʼ end-of-life needs, and this includes not only facilitating home care but also increasing access to PCU care.
Keywords advance healthcare directive living will end-of-life care palliative care unit place of death
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2014-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume68
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 339
End Page 348
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2014 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 25519028
Web of Sience KeyUT 000346882200004
Related Url http://ousar.lib.okayama-u.ac.jp/metadata/53134
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53027
FullText URL 68_6_375.pdf
Author Yamanaka, Reiko| Soga, Yoshihiko| Moriya, Yoshie| Okui, Akemi| Takeuchi, Tetsuo| Sato, Kenji| Morimatsu, Hiroshi| Morita, Manabu|
Abstract We encountered a 74-year-old male patient with tongue laceration after convulsive seizures under intensive care. The tongue showed severe swelling, and the right ventral surface had been lacerated by his isolated and pointed right lower canine. Our university hospital has established a perioperative management center, and is promoting interprofessional collaboration, including dentists, in perioperative management. Dentists collaborating in the perioperative management center took dental impressions, with the support of anesthesiologists who opened the patientʼs jaw under propofol sedation, to produce a mouth protector. By raising the patientʼs bite, the completed mouth protector prevented the isolated tooth from contacting the tongue and protected the lacerated wound. Use of the mouth protector prevented the lacerated tongue from coming into contact with the pointed tooth, and the tongue healed gradually. These findings underscore that interprofessional collaboration including dentists can improve the quality of medical care.
Keywords mouth protector tongue laceration
Amo Type Case Report
Published Date 2014-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume68
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 375
End Page 378
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2014 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 25519032
Web of Sience KeyUT 000346882200008