JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/30773
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Hitomi, Sayoko| Su, Wei Dong| Hong, Luo Jia| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro|
Abstract <p>Sections of the visual cortex of newborn (1-4 weeks after birth) and adult cats were stained with cationic iron colloid, aldehyde fuchsin or lectins (lectin Vicia villosa, soybean and Wisteria floribunda agglutinins). Many neurons in the adult cat visual cortex contained perineuronal sulfated proteoglycans detectable with cationic iron colloid and aldehyde fuchsin, or cell surface glycoproteins reactive to lectins. Double staining indicated that some of the lectin-labeled neurons were not stained with cationic iron colloid, and also that some of the cationic iron colloid-stained neurons were not labeled with lectins. The perineuronal sulfated proteoglycans and cell surface glycoproteins developed 3 weeks after birth. In the newborn cats 1-2 weeks after birth, no neurons were reactive to cationic iron colloid, aldehyde fuchsin or lectins. In the newborn cats 34 weeks after birth, it was clearly observed that the cytoplasm of the glial cells closely associated with the neurons containing the perineuronal sulfated proteoglycans showed an intense reaction to cationic iron colloid and aldehyde fuchsin, and that the Golgi complexes of the neurons with cell surface glycoproteins were intensely labeled with lectins. These findings suggest that the perineuronal sulfated proteoglycans are derived from the associated glial cells, and that the cell surface glycoproteins are produced by the associated nerve cells.</p>
Keywords cat brain perineuronal sulfated proteoglycans cell surface glycoproteins cationic iron colloid aldehyde fuchsin lectin
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1997-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume51
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 295
End Page 299
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 9439770
Web of Science KeyUT 000071183400001
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32837
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Murakami, Shinichiro| Horiuchi, Kanji| Yamamoto, Chugo| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro|
Abstract <p>A rare anomaly of the scalenus muscles is described. In this case, the right scalenus anterior muscle was absent. As a substitute for this muscle, some aberrant muscle slips arose from the lower vertebrae and descended in front of the ventral rami of the lower cervical nerves. These aberrant slips then ran between the ventral rami of the the eighth cervical and first thoracic nerves, and were fused with the right scalenus medius muscle. Thus, the subclavian artery and vein ran in front of the aberrant slips, together with the ventral ramus of the first thoracic nerve. The aberrant muscle slips issued 2 accessory bundles. One bundle ran between the ventral rami of the fourth and fifth cervical nerves and was fused with the scalenus medius muscle; the other bundle ran between the ventral rami of the fifth and sixth cervical nerves and was fused with the scalenus medius muscle.</p>
Keywords scalenus anterior muscle scalenus medius muscle ventral rami of the lower cervical nerves ventral ramus of the first thoracic nerve subclavian artery and vein
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2003-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume57
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 159
End Page 161
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 12908014
Web of Science KeyUT 000183816500008
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32280
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Su, Wei-Dong| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Taguchi, Takehito| Murakami, Takuro|
Abstract <p>The accessory ascending cervical artery (Murakami et al., 1996), which arises from the subclavian artery and ascends between the scalenus anterior and medius muscles, was studied in 87 Japanese adult cadavers (174 sides), with special attention being given to its origin, distribution, and relationship to other arteries at the cervical or scalenus region. In 154 sides (88.5%), the accessory ascending cervical artery was found to originate from the subclavian artery behind the scalenus anterior muscle, and to branch out to the scalenus anterior and medius muscles as well as those entering the 5th and 6th intervertebral foramens along the 6th and 7th cervical nerves. This artery arose independently in 105 sides. The accessory ascending cervical artery issued off or formed a common trunk with the transverse cervical artery and/or costocervical trunk in 49 sides. In cases lacking the accessory ascending cervical artery, it was usually compensated for by the costocervial trunk and/or transverse cervical artery (18 sides). Common trunk formation with the vertebral, internal thoracic, or suprascapular arteries was not observed. The authors suggest that the accessory ascending cervical artery, the transverse cervical artery, and the costocervical trunk should be grouped into one arterial system, a system that may be a remnant of the precostal longitudinal anastomoses of intersegmental arteries of the dorsal aorta behind the scalenus anterior muscle.</p>
Keywords accessory ascending cervical artery transverse cervical artery costocervical trunk scalenus anterior muscle subclavian artery
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2000-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume54
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 243
End Page 252
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 11132917
Web of Science KeyUT 000166042900002
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31710
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Murakami, Shinichiro| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro|
Abstract <p>Two previously unknown anomalies of the anterior intercostobrachial nerve were described. In one case, the anterior intercostobrachial nerve penetrated the pectoralis minor muscle. In the other case, it penetrated the pectoralis major muscle. In both cases, the anomalous nerve supplied the skin of the upper arm.</p>
Keywords anomalies of intercostobrachial nerve lateral cutaneous branch of the second intercostal nerve pectoralis minor muscle pectoralis major muscle
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2002-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume56
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 267
End Page 269
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 12530511
Web of Science KeyUT 000178668100008
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31855
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Nishibori, Masahiro| Takahashi, Hide K.| Katayama, Hiroshi| Mori, Shuji| Saito, Shinya| Iwagaki, Hiromi| Tanaka, Noriaki| Morita, Kiyoshi| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Abstract Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the major causes of septic shock. The polymyxin B-immobilized filter column (PMX) was developed for the adsorption of endotoxin by direct hemoperfusion and has been used for the treatment of LPS-induced septic shock. In this study, we demonstrated that PMX also specifically bound monocytes from the peripheral blood leukocytes of septic patients by mean of an analysis of bound cells using immunocytochemical and electron microscopic techniques. The specific removal of monocytes from septic patients may produce beneficial effects by reducing the interaction between monocytes and functionally associated cells including vascular endothelial cells.
Keywords septic shock polymixin B-immobilized column monocyte adsorptive removal
Amo Type Short Communication
Published Date 2009-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume63
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 65
End Page 69
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
Web of Science KeyUT 000263730300009
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/40502
FullText URL 64_5_277.pdf
Author Kumase, Fumiaki| Morizane, Yuki| Mohri, Satoshi| Takasu, Ippei| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Ohtsuki, Hiroshi|
Abstract Endothelial glycocalyx (GCX) has been reported as a protective factor for vascular endothelial cells (VEC) in diabetes and hypertension. However, the involvement of GCX impairment in ocular vasculopathy remains unclear. We evaluated the changes in the GCX thicknesses of the retinal and choroidal capillaries in rats with diabetes and hypertension by cationic colloidal iron staining using a transmission electron microscope. In the control group, the mean (standard error of the mean) thicknesses of retinal and choroidal GCX were 60.2 (1.5) nm and 84.3 (3.1) nm, respectively. The diabetic rats showed a significant decrease of GCX thickness in the retina, but not in the choroid, compared to controls (28.3 (0.3) nm, p<0.01 and 77.8 (1.4) nm, respectively). In the hypertensive rats, both retinal and choroidal GCX were significantly decreased compared to the control values (10.9 (0.4) nm and 13.2 (1.0) nm, respectively, both p<0.01). Moreover, we could visualize the adhesion of leukocytes and platelets on the luminal surface of VEC, at the site where the GCX was markedly degraded. These findings suggest that the GCX prevents adhesion of leukocytes and platelets to the VEC surface, and this impairment may lead to ocular vasculopathy in diabetes and hypertension.
Keywords glycocalyx retina choroid diabetes hypertension
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 277
End Page 283
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2010 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20975760
Web of Sience KeyUT 000283563300002
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32865
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Murai, Hiroyasu| Hiragami, Fukumi| Kawamura, Kenji| Motoda, Hirotoshi| Koike, Yoshihisa| Inoue, Shigeki| Kumagishi, Kanae| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Kano, Yoshio|
Abstract <p>Among the 3 mitogen-activated protein kinases -- ERK, p38 MAPK and JNK -- JNK has been suggested to participate in apoptosis, whereas p38 MAPK is thought to be part of the differentiation response. There are many common inducers of JNK and p38 MAPK, but the mechanisms underlying the differential response to apoptosis and differentiation are poorly understood. We found that heatshock activated p38 MAPK at 3min after exposure to a temperature of 44 in stress-hypersensitive PC12m3 mutant cells, while it activated JNK at 20min after the same heat treatment. However, heat shock activated p38 MAPK 5min after heat treatment and JNK 10min after heat treatment in PC12 parental cells. The extent of phosphorylation of p38 MAPK induced by heat shock in PC12m3 cells was significantly greater than that in PC12 parental cells, and a high level of heat-shock-induced neurite outgrowth was observed only in PC12m3 cells. On the other hand, heat-shock-induced JNK activation appeared more quickly and apoptosis started earlier in PC12 parental cells. These findings indicate that short stress induces p38 MAPK and longer stress induces JNK, and that the response of these kinases to heat shock differs depending on cell type.</p>
Keywords heat shock neurite outgrowth p38 MAP kinase JNK PC12 mutant cells
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 55
End Page 62
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20200585
Web of Science KeyUT 000274868300008
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32859
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Murakami, Shinichiro| Fujino, Hidemi| Takeda, Isao| Momota, Ryusuke| Kumagishi, Kanae| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Abstract <p>The skeletal muscle is classified into 2 types, slow oxidative or fast glycolytic muscle. For further characterization, we investigated the capillary architecture in slow and fast muscles. The rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were used as representatives of slow and fast muscles, respectively. To investigate capillary density, sections of both types of muscle were stained with alkaline phosphatase;the soleus muscle showed more intense reactivity, indicating that it had a denser capillary structure than the EDL muscle. We then injected fluorescent contrast medium into samples of both muscle types for light and confocal-laser microscopic evaluation. The capillary density and capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher, and the course of the capillaries was more tortuous, in the soleus muscle than in the EDL muscle. Capillary coursed more tortuously in the soleus than in the EDL muscle. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, an indicator of mitochondrial oxidative capacity, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were also significantly higher in the soleus muscle. Thus, we conclude that slow oxidative muscle possess a rich capillary structure to provide demanded oxygen, and VEGF might be involved in the formation and/or maintenance of this highly capillarized architecture.</p>
Keywords skeletal muscle capillaly succinate dehydrogenase activity vascular endothelial growth factor
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 11
End Page 18
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20200579
Web of Science KeyUT 000274868300002
Author Shinaoka, Akira| Momota, Ryusuke| Shiratsuchi, Eri| Kosaka, Mitsuko| Kumagishi, Kanae| Nakahara, Ryuichi| Naito, Ichiro| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 2013-04
Publication Title Microscopy and Microanalysis
Volume volume19
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Momota, Ryusuke| Naito, Ichiro| Ninomiya, Yoshifumi| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 2011-05
Publication Title Matrix Biology
Volume volume30
Issue issue4
Content Type Journal Article
Author Liu, Jing-Jie| Ohtani, Osamu| Kiuta, Akio| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Taguchi, Takehito| Murakami, Takuro| Sano, Tadashi|
Published Date 1988
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume100
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Song, Zheng-Ian| Kikuta, Akio| Ohtani, Osamu| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro| Sano, Tadashi|
Published Date 1988
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume100
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Taguchi, Takehito| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 1993-02-27
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume105
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Yamana, Seizo|
Published Date 1996-10-31
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume108
Issue issue9-10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 1996-02-29
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume107
Issue issue11-12
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Piao, Da xun|
Published Date 1995-10-31
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume107
Issue issue9-10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Hitomi, Sayoko| Sato, Tohru| Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Taguchi, Takehito|
Published Date 1996-06-29
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume108
Issue issue3-6
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Su, Wei Dong| Hong, Luo Jia| Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Seo, Kenji|
Published Date 1997-12-25
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume109
Issue issue7-12
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Shinichirou| Matsuoka, Hiroaki| Fuyama, Yasuhiro| Taguchi, Takehito| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro|
Published Date 2001-04-28
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume113
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author 大塚 愛二|
Published Date 2005-05-20
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume117
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article