Author 大塚 愛二|
Published Date 2005-05-20
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume117
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Nishida, Keiichiro|
Published Date 1996-10-31
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume108
Issue issue9-10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Su, Wei Dong| Hong, Luo Jia| Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Seo, Kenji|
Published Date 1997-12-25
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume109
Issue issue7-12
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 1996-02-29
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume107
Issue issue11-12
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Shinichirou| Matsuoka, Hiroaki| Fuyama, Yasuhiro| Taguchi, Takehito| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro|
Published Date 2001-04-28
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume113
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Yamana, Seizo|
Published Date 1996-10-31
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume108
Issue issue9-10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Hitomi, Sayoko| Sato, Tohru| Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Taguchi, Takehito|
Published Date 1996-06-29
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume108
Issue issue3-6
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Taguchi, Takehito| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 1993-02-27
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume105
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Okuma, Yu| Liu, Keyue| Wake, Hidenori| Haruma, Jun| Yoshino, Tadashi| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Takahashi, Hideo| Mori, Shuji| Nishibori, Masahiro| Date, Isao|
Published Date 2013-08-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume125
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Song, Zheng-Ian| Kikuta, Akio| Ohtani, Osamu| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro| Sano, Tadashi|
Published Date 1988
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume100
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Yamashita, Toru| Kamiya, Tatsushi| Deguchi, Kentaro| Inaba, Toshiki| Zhang, Hanzhe| Shang, Jingwei| Miyazaki, Kazunori| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Katayama, Yasuo| Abe, Koji|
Published Date 2010-12-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume122
Issue issue3
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Piao, Da xun|
Published Date 1995-10-31
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume107
Issue issue9-10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Liu, Jing-Jie| Ohtani, Osamu| Kiuta, Akio| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Taguchi, Takehito| Murakami, Takuro| Sano, Tadashi|
Published Date 1988
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume100
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32280
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Su, Wei-Dong| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Taguchi, Takehito| Murakami, Takuro|
Abstract <p>The accessory ascending cervical artery (Murakami et al., 1996), which arises from the subclavian artery and ascends between the scalenus anterior and medius muscles, was studied in 87 Japanese adult cadavers (174 sides), with special attention being given to its origin, distribution, and relationship to other arteries at the cervical or scalenus region. In 154 sides (88.5%), the accessory ascending cervical artery was found to originate from the subclavian artery behind the scalenus anterior muscle, and to branch out to the scalenus anterior and medius muscles as well as those entering the 5th and 6th intervertebral foramens along the 6th and 7th cervical nerves. This artery arose independently in 105 sides. The accessory ascending cervical artery issued off or formed a common trunk with the transverse cervical artery and/or costocervical trunk in 49 sides. In cases lacking the accessory ascending cervical artery, it was usually compensated for by the costocervial trunk and/or transverse cervical artery (18 sides). Common trunk formation with the vertebral, internal thoracic, or suprascapular arteries was not observed. The authors suggest that the accessory ascending cervical artery, the transverse cervical artery, and the costocervical trunk should be grouped into one arterial system, a system that may be a remnant of the precostal longitudinal anastomoses of intersegmental arteries of the dorsal aorta behind the scalenus anterior muscle.</p>
Keywords accessory ascending cervical artery transverse cervical artery costocervical trunk scalenus anterior muscle subclavian artery
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2000-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume54
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 243
End Page 252
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 11132917
Web of Sience KeyUT 000166042900002
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31299
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro|
Abstract <p>Origins and distribution of the human inferior phrenic arteries were studied by dissecting 68 Japanese adult cadavers. The inferior phrenic arteries were usually observed as paired (left and right) vessels. Their origins were summarized as follows: a) the aorta itself (85/138 cases, 61.6%), b) the ventro-visceral arteries (celiaco-mesenteric system of the aorta) including the celiac trunk (39/138 cases, 28.2%) and the left gastric artery (4/138 cases, 2.9%), and c) the latero-visceral arteries (adreno-renal system of the aorta) including the middle adrenal artery (4/138 cases, 2.9%) and the renal artery (6/138 cases, 4.3%). The left and right arteries occasionally originated in common trunk from the aorta, celiaco-mesenteric system or adreno-renal system (22/138 cases, 15.9%). A typological diagram explaining these variations is given. The inferior phrenic arteries, especially the left ones, sometimes issued visceral or esophageal branches. This fact indicates that the inferior phrenic arteries are homologous with the celiac trunk and mesenteric arteries. It is further discussed that the celiac trunk and mesenteric arteries are originally paired vessels, through introduction of our previous typological diagram of the abdominal arteries.</p>
Keywords inferior phrenic artery esophageal branch typology of abdominal arteries
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1998-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume52
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 189
End Page 196
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 9781269
Web of Sience KeyUT 000075623600003
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32301
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Endo, Ryutaro| Murakami, Shinichiro| Masuda, Yu| Taguchi, Takehito| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Nishizaki, Kazunori| Murakami, Takuro|
Abstract <p>The present study showed that many neurons in the adult rat brain possessed a perineuronal sulfated proteoglycan surface coat which reacted to cationic iron colloid and aldehyde fuchsin. This surface coat was stained supravitally with Ehrlich's methylene blue and doubly stained with Ehrlich's methylene blue and aldehyde fuchsin. The surface coat was also stained with Gomori's ammoniacal silver and doubly stained with Gomori's ammoniacal silver and cationic iron colloid. The surface coat was usually expressed together with a nerve cell surface glycoprotein net detectable with lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin. These findings indicate that the perineuronal proteoglycan surface coat is identical to Cajal's superficial reticulum and contains some collagenous elements. It was further demonstrated that collagenase digestion erased Gomori's ammoniacal silver impregnation within the perineuronal proteoglycan surface coat.</p>
Keywords brain extracellular matrix perineuronal proteoglycans cell surface glycoproteins
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2000-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume54
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 111
End Page 118
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 10925735
Web of Sience KeyUT 000087965700003
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31092
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Murakami, Takuro| Tsubouchi, Mari| Tubouchi, Yutaka| Taguchi, Takehito| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Abstract <p>Neurons with strongly negatively charged surface coats were recognized in mammalian, avian, reptilian, amphibian and piscine brains. Many large-sized neurons had strongly negatively charged surface coats in the visual cortex and brain stem of the cow, cat, guinea pig, mouse, quail and parakeet. Such neurons were also seen in the brain stem of the lower vertebrates such as the house lizard, Japanese terrapin, bullfrog, newt, carp and sweetfish.</p>
Keywords central nervous system neurons negatively charged surface coats proteoglycans
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1994-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume48
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 195
End Page 197
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 7817774
Web of Sience KeyUT A1994PE51400004
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31005
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Ikebuchi, Yoshifumi| Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Abstract <p>The interosseous and lumbrical muscles in twenty-five hands of Japanese adult cadavers were dissected. The palmar and dorsal interosseous muscles continued, with few exceptions, into the wing tendons. The dorsal interosseous muscles gave off tendons which pierced the transverse laminae or passed deep to the transverse laminae, and attached to the bases of the proximal phalanges. The palmar interosseous muscles seldom had such attachments. The palmar and dorsal interosseous muscles sometimes gave off additional tendons which passed superficial to the transverse laminae and attached to the bases of the proximal phalanges. These latter attachments were typical in the contrahentes muscles. Thus, the present findings suggest that the human dorsal interosseous muscles are composite muscles derived from the dorsal abductor, flexor brevis and contrahens muscles, and that the human palmar interosseous muscles are composite muscles derived from the flexor brevis and contrahens muscles. The lumbrical muscles rarely gave off accessory slips with atavistic attachments to the proximal phalanges.</p>
Keywords human hand palmar interosseous muscles dorsal interosseous muslcles lumbrical muscles
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1988-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume42
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 327
End Page 334
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 3239437
Web of Sience KeyUT A1988R743300004
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/49666
FullText URL 67_2_87.pdf
Author Matsuo, Toshihiko| Takeda, Yoshimasa| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Abstract The purpose of this study was to develop a series of stereoscopic anatomical images of the eye and orbit for use in the curricula of medical schools and residency programs in ophthalmology and other specialties. Layer-by-layer dissection of the eyelid, eyeball, and orbit of a cadaver was performed by an ophthalmologist. A stereoscopic camera system was used to capture a series of anatomical views that were scanned in a panoramic three-dimensional manner around the center of the lid fissure. The images could be rotated 360 degrees in the frontal plane and the angle of views could be tilted up to 90 degrees along the anteroposterior axis perpendicular to the frontal plane around the 360 degrees. The skin, orbicularis oculi muscle, and upper and lower tarsus were sequentially observed. The upper and lower eyelids were removed to expose the bulbar conjunctiva and to insert three 25-gauge trocars for vitrectomy at the location of the pars plana. The cornea was cut at the limbus, and the lens with mature cataract was dislocated. The sclera was cut to observe the trocars from inside the eyeball. The sclera was further cut to visualize the superior oblique muscle with the trochlea and the inferior oblique muscle. The eyeball was dissected completely to observe the optic nerve and the ophthalmic artery. The thin bones of the medial and inferior orbital wall were cracked with a forceps to expose the ethmoid and maxillary sinus, respectively. In conclusion, the serial dissection images visualized aspects of the local anatomy specific to various procedures, including the levator muscle and tarsus for blepharoptosis surgery, 25-gauge trocars as viewed from inside the eye globe for vitrectomy, the oblique muscles for strabismus surgery, and the thin medial and inferior orbital bony walls for orbital bone fractures.
Keywords stereoscopic camera-captured images education local anatomical dissection orbit eye
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2013-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume67
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 87
End Page 91
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2013 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 23603924
Web of Sience KeyUT 000317801700002
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31855
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Nishibori, Masahiro| Takahashi, Hide K.| Katayama, Hiroshi| Mori, Shuji| Saito, Shinya| Iwagaki, Hiromi| Tanaka, Noriaki| Morita, Kiyoshi| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Abstract Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the major causes of septic shock. The polymyxin B-immobilized filter column (PMX) was developed for the adsorption of endotoxin by direct hemoperfusion and has been used for the treatment of LPS-induced septic shock. In this study, we demonstrated that PMX also specifically bound monocytes from the peripheral blood leukocytes of septic patients by mean of an analysis of bound cells using immunocytochemical and electron microscopic techniques. The specific removal of monocytes from septic patients may produce beneficial effects by reducing the interaction between monocytes and functionally associated cells including vascular endothelial cells.
Keywords septic shock polymixin B-immobilized column monocyte adsorptive removal
Amo Type Short Communication
Published Date 2009-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume63
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 65
End Page 69
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
Web of Sience KeyUT 000263730300009