Author 大塚 愛二|
Published Date 1984-03-31
Publication Title
Content Type Thesis or Dissertation
Author 大塚 愛二|
Published Date 2005-05-20
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume117
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Shinichirou| Matsuoka, Hiroaki| Fuyama, Yasuhiro| Taguchi, Takehito| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro|
Published Date 2001-04-28
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume113
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Su, Wei Dong| Hong, Luo Jia| Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Seo, Kenji|
Published Date 1997-12-25
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume109
Issue issue7-12
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Hitomi, Sayoko| Sato, Tohru| Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Taguchi, Takehito|
Published Date 1996-06-29
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume108
Issue issue3-6
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Piao, Da xun|
Published Date 1995-10-31
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume107
Issue issue9-10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 1996-02-29
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume107
Issue issue11-12
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Piao, Da Xun| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Nishida, Keiichiro|
Published Date 1996-10-31
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume108
Issue issue9-10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Yamana, Seizo|
Published Date 1996-10-31
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume108
Issue issue9-10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Takuro| Taguchi, Takehito| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 1993-02-27
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume105
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Song, Zheng-Ian| Kikuta, Akio| Ohtani, Osamu| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Murakami, Takuro| Sano, Tadashi|
Published Date 1988
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume100
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Liu, Jing-Jie| Ohtani, Osamu| Kiuta, Akio| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Taguchi, Takehito| Murakami, Takuro| Sano, Tadashi|
Published Date 1988
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume100
Issue issue1-2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Yamashita, Toru| Kamiya, Tatsushi| Deguchi, Kentaro| Inaba, Toshiki| Zhang, Hanzhe| Shang, Jingwei| Miyazaki, Kazunori| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Katayama, Yasuo| Abe, Koji|
Published Date 2010-12-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume122
Issue issue3
Content Type Journal Article
Author Momota, Ryusuke| Naito, Ichiro| Ninomiya, Yoshifumi| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 2011-05
Publication Title Matrix Biology
Volume volume30
Issue issue4
Content Type Journal Article
Author Okuma, Yu| Liu, Keyue| Wake, Hidenori| Haruma, Jun| Yoshino, Tadashi| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Takahashi, Hideo| Mori, Shuji| Nishibori, Masahiro| Date, Isao|
Published Date 2013-08-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume125
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Shinaoka, Akira| Momota, Ryusuke| Shiratsuchi, Eri| Kosaka, Mitsuko| Kumagishi, Kanae| Nakahara, Ryuichi| Naito, Ichiro| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Published Date 2013-04
Publication Title Microscopy and Microanalysis
Volume volume19
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53119
FullText URL 69_1_29.pdf
Author Nakahara, Ryuichi| Nishida, Keiichiro| Hashizume, Kenzo| Harada, Ryouzou| Machida, Takahiro| Horita, Masahiro| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract The outcome measures in rheumatology clinical trials (OMERACT) scores are the most mature quantitation system for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Direct measuring techniques of synovial volume have been reported with good reproducibility, although few reports have demonstrated the changes of these measures in response to treatment. To assess these clinical responses, we evaluated the correlation of the changes of clinical activity score 28-joints disease activity score (DAS28-CRP) with the changes of OMERACT scores and with synovial volume measurements. Eight RA patients who were treated by biologic agents were examined with MRI of the dominant affected wrist and finger joints before and one year after the treatment. The total OMERACT score was reduced from 48.0 to 41.3, and synovial volume was reduced from 15.4 to 8.8 milliliters. Positive correlations were seen between the changes of DAS28-CRP and the changes of OMERACT synovitis score (r=0.27), OMERACT total score (r=0.43) and synovial volume (r=0.30). Limited to synovium assessment, synovial volume showed a better correlation with DAS28-CRP than the OMERACT synovitis score. On the other hand, the OMERACT total score showed a higher correlation with DAS28-CRP than synovial volume, probably because the OMERACT total score includes scores for bone erosion and bone edema as well.
Keywords magnetic resonance imaging rheumatoid arthritis outcome measures in rheumatology clinical trials scoring system direct volume measuring medical work station
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2015-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume69
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 29
End Page 35
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2015 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 25703168
Web of Sience KeyUT 000349740300003
Related Url http://ousar.lib.okayama-u.ac.jp/metadata/53113
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/49666
FullText URL 67_2_87.pdf
Author Matsuo, Toshihiko| Takeda, Yoshimasa| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Abstract The purpose of this study was to develop a series of stereoscopic anatomical images of the eye and orbit for use in the curricula of medical schools and residency programs in ophthalmology and other specialties. Layer-by-layer dissection of the eyelid, eyeball, and orbit of a cadaver was performed by an ophthalmologist. A stereoscopic camera system was used to capture a series of anatomical views that were scanned in a panoramic three-dimensional manner around the center of the lid fissure. The images could be rotated 360 degrees in the frontal plane and the angle of views could be tilted up to 90 degrees along the anteroposterior axis perpendicular to the frontal plane around the 360 degrees. The skin, orbicularis oculi muscle, and upper and lower tarsus were sequentially observed. The upper and lower eyelids were removed to expose the bulbar conjunctiva and to insert three 25-gauge trocars for vitrectomy at the location of the pars plana. The cornea was cut at the limbus, and the lens with mature cataract was dislocated. The sclera was cut to observe the trocars from inside the eyeball. The sclera was further cut to visualize the superior oblique muscle with the trochlea and the inferior oblique muscle. The eyeball was dissected completely to observe the optic nerve and the ophthalmic artery. The thin bones of the medial and inferior orbital wall were cracked with a forceps to expose the ethmoid and maxillary sinus, respectively. In conclusion, the serial dissection images visualized aspects of the local anatomy specific to various procedures, including the levator muscle and tarsus for blepharoptosis surgery, 25-gauge trocars as viewed from inside the eye globe for vitrectomy, the oblique muscles for strabismus surgery, and the thin medial and inferior orbital bony walls for orbital bone fractures.
Keywords stereoscopic camera-captured images education local anatomical dissection orbit eye
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2013-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume67
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 87
End Page 91
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2013 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 23603924
Web of Sience KeyUT 000317801700002
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32855
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Shimamura, Yasunori| Nishida, Keiichiro| Imatani, Junya| Noda, Tomoyuki| Hashizume, Hiroyuki| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract <p>We biomechanically evaluated the bone fixation rigidity of an ONI plate (Group I) during fixation of experimentally created transcondylar humerus fractures in cadaveric elbows, which are the most frequently observed humeral fractures in the elderly, and compared it with the rigidity achieved by 3 conventional fixation methods:an LCP reconstruction plate 3.5 using a locking mechanism (Group II), a conventional reconstruction plate 3.5 (CRP) with a cannulated cancellous screw (Group III), and a CRP with 2 cannulated cancellous screws (CS) in a crisscross orientation (Group IV). In the axial loading test, the mean failure loads were:Group I, 98.9+/-32.6;Group II, 108.5+/-27.2;Group III, 50.0+/-7.5;and Group IV, 34.5+/-12.2 (N). Group I fixations failed at a significantly higher load than those of Groups III and IV (p0.05). In the extension loading test, the mean failure loads were:Group I, 34.0+/-12.4;Group II, 51.0+/-14.8;Group III, 19.3+/-6.0;and Group IV, 14.7+/-3.1 (N). Group IV fixations showed a significantly lower failure load than those of Group I (p0.05). The fixation rigidities against mechanical loading by the ONI plate and LCP plate were comparable. These results suggested that an ONI system might be superior to the CRP and CS method, and comparable to the LCP method in terms of fixation rigidity for distal humerus fractures.</p>
Keywords distal humerus fracture biomechanics internal fixation elderly
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 115
End Page 120
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20424666
Web of Sience KeyUT 000276996900005
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32859
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Murakami, Shinichiro| Fujino, Hidemi| Takeda, Isao| Momota, Ryusuke| Kumagishi, Kanae| Ohtsuka, Aiji|
Abstract <p>The skeletal muscle is classified into 2 types, slow oxidative or fast glycolytic muscle. For further characterization, we investigated the capillary architecture in slow and fast muscles. The rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were used as representatives of slow and fast muscles, respectively. To investigate capillary density, sections of both types of muscle were stained with alkaline phosphatase;the soleus muscle showed more intense reactivity, indicating that it had a denser capillary structure than the EDL muscle. We then injected fluorescent contrast medium into samples of both muscle types for light and confocal-laser microscopic evaluation. The capillary density and capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher, and the course of the capillaries was more tortuous, in the soleus muscle than in the EDL muscle. Capillary coursed more tortuously in the soleus than in the EDL muscle. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, an indicator of mitochondrial oxidative capacity, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were also significantly higher in the soleus muscle. Thus, we conclude that slow oxidative muscle possess a rich capillary structure to provide demanded oxygen, and VEGF might be involved in the formation and/or maintenance of this highly capillarized architecture.</p>
Keywords skeletal muscle capillaly succinate dehydrogenase activity vascular endothelial growth factor
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 11
End Page 18
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20200579
Web of Sience KeyUT 000274868300002