JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54981
FullText URL 71_2_127.pdf
Author Shirakawa, Yasuhiro| Noma, Kazuhiro| Maeda, Naoaki| Tanabe, Shunsuke| Kuroda, Shinji| Kagawa, Shunsuke| Katsui, Kuniaki| Katayama, Norihisa| Kanazawa, Susumu| Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi|
Abstract Currently, chemoradiation is the most widely used nonsurgical treatment for esophageal cancer. However, some patients, particularly the very elderly or those with severe vital organ dysfunction, face difficulty with the chemotherapy component. We therefore examined the outcome of radiation therapy (RT) alone for patients with esophageal cancer at our facility. Between January 2005 and December 2014, 84 patients underwent RT at our hospital, and 78 of these patients received concomitant chemotherapy. The remaining 6 patients underwent RT alone; these patients were considered to be high-risk and to have no lymph node metastasis (stage I). Five of them received irradiation up to a curative dose: 4 showed a complete response (CR) and 1 showed a partial response (PR). Of the patients exhibiting CR, 3 are currently living recurrence-free, whereas 1 patient underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as salvage therapy for local recurrence, with no subsequent recurrence. High-risk stage I esophageal cancer patients can be treated radically with RT alone under certain conditions. In the future, to broaden the indications for RT monotherapy to include some degree of advanced cancers, a novel concurrent therapy should be identified.
Keywords esophageal cancer radiation therapy high-risk patient
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2017-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 127
End Page 133
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 28420894
Author Waki, Takahiro| Katsui, Kuniaki| Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu| Ogata, Takeshi| Katayama, Norihisa| Takemoto, Mitsuhiro| Nasu, Yasutomo| Kumon, Hiromi| Kanazawa, Susumu|
Published Date 2017-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54823
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53554
FullText URL 69_4_189.pdf
Author Yamashita, Mako| Katayama, Norihisa| Waki, Takahiro| Katsui, Kuniaki| Himei, Kengo| Takemoto, Mitsuhiro| Kanazawa, Susumu|
Abstract This study compared field-in-field (FIF) radiotherapy with conformal radiotherapy with physical wedges for the treatment of unilateral cervical malignant lymphoma. Two treatment plans, the FIF technique and conformal RT, were generated for each of 32 patients with unilateral cervical malignant lymphoma. To compare the 2 treatment plans, dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume (PTV), the thyroid, submandibular gland, carotid artery, mucosa, spinal cord, and surrounding normal tissue, and monitor unit (MU) were analyzed. The FIF technique showed significant reduction in the mean dose of thyroid, submandibular gland, carotid artery and mucosa, the maximum dose of the spinal cord and PTV, and the volume receiving>107% of the prescribed dose of surrounding normal tissue (p<0.001). In addition, there were gains in the homogeneity index of the PTV for FIF. Furthermore, the total MU was also lower for the FIF technique than for the wedge technique (p<0.001). Compared with the wedge technique, the FIF technique improved the dose homogeneity of the PTV, reduced the dose to normal structures, and was associated with fewer MUs in the treatment of patients with cervical malignant lymphoma.
Keywords field-in-field technique wedge lymphoma monitor units dose-volume histogram
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2015-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume69
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 189
End Page 195
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2015 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 26289909
Web of Sience KeyUT 000365519100001