JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/55436
FullText URL 71_5_391.pdf
Author Iwamuro, Masaya| Takata, Katsuyoshi| Hayashi, Eiko| Kawano, Seiji| Hiraoka, Sakiko| Kawahara, Yoshiro| Yoshino, Tadashi| Okada, Hiroyuki|
Abstract  To evaluate the usefulness of colonoscopy for the detection of ileal involvement in patients with intestinal follicular lymphoma, seventeen patients with intestinal follicular lymphoma who underwent colonoscopy and biopsy sampling from the terminal ileum were enrolled. The patients were divided into 2 groups: cases with ileal involvement (n=6) and cases without ileal involvement (n=11). Patients’ clinical backgrounds were compared between the two groups. Subsequently, 10 board-certified endoscopists independently evaluated the endoscopic pictures and determined whether the ileum was involved with follicular lymphoma. Infiltration of follicular lymphoma cells were identified in 6 patients (35.3%). Cases with positive ileal involvement were diagnosed with follicular lymphoma at a younger age than were cases without ileal involvement (55.4±7.4 vs. 68.1±10.3 years, p=0.011). Macroscopically, in patients with ileal involvement, there were multiple polypoid elevations smaller than 5 mm in 4 cases, single polypoid elevation smaller than 5 mm in 1 case, and single polypoid elevation larger than 5 mm in 1 case. In patients without ileal involvement, there were no lesions in the terminal ileum in 7 cases, and multiple polypoid elevations smaller than 5 mm were seen in 4 cases. The accuracy of the macroscopic evaluation by 10 board-certified endoscopists was 68.8%. Colonoscopy is particularly recommended during the initial workup of patients with follicular lymphoma diagnosed at age ≤ 60 years. The diagnosis of ileal involvement based on morphology alone is difficult; thus, biopsy and pathologic diagnosis are required for accurate diagnosis.
Keywords follicular lymphoma colonoscopy ileal neoplasms terminal ileum small intestine
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2017-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 391
End Page 398
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 29042696
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54977
FullText URL 71_2_97.pdf
Author Iwamuro, Masaya| Kondo, Eisei| Tanaka, Takehiro| Hagiya, Hideharu| Kawano, Seiji| Kawahara, Yoshiro| Otsuka, Fumio| Okada, Hiroyuki|
Abstract We retrospectively analyzed the cases of 14 patients (9 women, 5 men, mean age: 51.6 years) with cytomegalovirus (CMV) involvement in the esophagus, stomach, and/or duodenum diagnosed at a single center, to determine their endoscopic features and clinical backgrounds. Thirteen patients (92.9%) had hematologic disease; the other had rheumatoid arthritis. Of the former, 12 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 9 of these patients had graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) before undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). All 14 patients had been taking one or more immunosuppressive agents including cyclosporine (n=10), corticosteroids (n=9), mycophenolic acid (n=6), tacrolimus (n=3), and methotrexate (n=1). Tests for CMV antigenemia were positive in 11 patients (78.6%). EGD examinations revealed esophageal (n=3), gastric (n=9), and duodenal involvement (n=6). Macroscopically, esophageal lesions by CMV infection presented as redness (n=1), erosions (n=1), and ulcers (n=1). Gastric lesions manifested as redness (n=7), erosions (n=3), exfoliated mucosa (n=2), and verrucous erosions (n=1). Mucosal appearances in the duodenum varied: redness (n=2), ulcers (n=2), multiple erosions (n=2), single erosion (n=1), edema (n=1). CMV was detected even in the intact duodenal mucosa (n=1). In conclusion, physicians must recall the relevance of CMV infection when any mucosal alterations exist in the upper gastrointestinal tract of immunosuppressed patients.
Keywords cytomegalovirus duodenum esophagogastroduodenoscopy esophagus stomach
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2017-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 97
End Page 104
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 28420890
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54810
FullText URL 70_6_469.pdf
Author Yamasaki, Yasushi| Takenaka, Ryuta| Hori, Keisuke| Takemoto, Koji| Kawano, Seiji| Kawahara, Yoshiro| Fujiki, Shigeatsu| Okada , Hiroyuki|
Abstract The usefulness of endoscopy in marginal ulcer bleeding has rarely been studied, and the optimal method for preventing rebleeding is unclear. Here we assessed the efficacy of endoscopy in marginal ulcer bleeding and examined the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the prevention of rebleeding. A total of 28 patients with marginal ulcer bleeding (21 men, 7 women; median age 58.5 years) were treated by endoscopy. We analyzed the clinical characteristics, results of endoscopic therapy, characteristics of rebleeding patients, and relation between the use of PPIs and the duration of rebleeding. Sixteen patients had active bleeding. Initial hemostasis was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related adverse events. Rebleeding occurred in one patient within the first month and in 7 patients thereafter. There was a significant difference in the rebleeding rate between the patients who received a PPI and those who did not. In a multivariate analysis, the non-use of PPIs was a risk factor for rebleeding (hazard ratio, 6.22). Therapeutic endoscopy is effective in achieving hemostasis from marginal ulcer bleeding. PPIs may prevent rebleeding from marginal ulcers.
Keywords marginal ulcer upper gastrointestinal bleeding endoscopic hemostasis proton-pump inhibitor
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2016-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume70
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 469
End Page 475
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2016 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 28003672
Author Gotoda, Tatsuhiro| Kawano, Seiji| Kono, Yoshiyasu| Miura, Kou| Kanzaki, Hiromitsu| Iwamuro, Masaya| Kawahara, Yoshiro| Tanaka, Takehiro| Yoshino, Tadashi| Shirakawad, Yasuhiro| Tabata, Masahiro| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Okada, Hiroyuki|
Published Date 2016-12-01
Publication Title Journal of Okayama Medical Association
Volume volume128
Issue issue3
Content Type Journal Article
Author Iwamuro, Masaya| Okada, Hiroyuki| Harada, Keita| Kanzaki, Hiromitsu| Hori, Keisuke| Kita, Masahide| Kawano, Seiji| Kawahara, Yoshiro| Tanaka, Takehiro| Yamamoto, Kazuhide|
Published Date 2016-12-01
Publication Title Journal of Okayama Medical Association
Volume volume128
Issue issue3
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53912
FullText URL 69_6_365.pdf
Author Kawano, Seiji| Hiraoka, Sakiko| Okada, Hiroyuki| Akita, Mitsuhiro| Iwamuro, Masaya| Yamamoto, Kazuhide|
Abstract Several studies have identified a relationship between myelodysplastic syndrome and Behçetʼs disease (BD), especially intestinal BD, and trisomy 8 appears to play an important role in these disorders. Despite this, only few case reports or series have been reported in gastroenterology, meaning that endoscopic findings and characteristics of intestinal BD have not been clarified yet. In this report, we describe three cases of intestinal BD associated with myelodysplastic syndrome and trisomy 8, and discuss the clinical features and problems of these disorders from a gastroenterology perspective.
Keywords Behçetʼs disease trisomy 8 myelodysplastic syndrome
Amo Type Case Reports
Published Date 2015-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume69
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 365
End Page 369
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2015 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 26690248
Web of Sience KeyUT 000368434500007
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/53120
FullText URL 69_1_37.pdf
Author Iwamuro, Masaya| Okada, Hiroyuki| Takata, Katsuyoshi| Kawai, Yoshinari| Kawano, Seiji| Nasu, Junichiro| Kawahara, Yoshiro| Tanaka, Takehiro| Yoshino, Tadashi| Yamamoto, Kazuhide|
Abstract The sensitivity and specificity of magnified endoscopic features for differentiating follicular lymphoma from other diseases with duodenal whitish lesions have never been investigated. Here we compared the magnified endoscopic features of duodenal follicular lymphoma with those of other whitish lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of patients with follicular lymphoma (n=9), lymphangiectasia (n=7), adenoma (n=10), duodenitis (n=4), erosion (n=1), lymphangioma (n=1), and hyperplastic polyp (n=1). The magnified features of the nine follicular lymphomas included enlarged villi (n=8), dilated microvessels (n=5), and opaque white spots of various sizes (n=9). The lymphangiectasias showed enlarged villi, dilated microvessels, and white spots, but the sizes of the white spots were relatively homogeneous and their margin was clear. Observation of the adenoma and duodenitis revealed only whitish villi. Although the lymphangioma was indistinguishable from the follicular lymphomas by magnified features, it was easily diagnosed based on the macroscopic morphology. In conclusion, magnified endoscopic features, in combination with macroscopic features, are useful for differentiating follicular lymphomas from other duodenal diseases presenting whitish lesions.
Keywords duodenal neoplasm follicular lymphoma gastrointestinal lymphoma magnifying endoscopy
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2015-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume69
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 37
End Page 44
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2015 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 25703169
Web of Sience KeyUT 000349740300004