JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/55850
フルテキストURL 72_2_105.pdf
著者 Kato, Ryo| Iwamuro, Masaya| Hiraoka, Sakiko| Takashima, Shiho| Inokuchi, Toshihiro| Takahara, Masahiro| Kondo, Yoshitaka| Tanaka, Takehiro| Okada, Hiroyuki|
抄録 To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients with ulcerative colitis who have upper gastrointestinal lesions, we retrospectively reviewed the data of 216 patients with ulcerative colitis who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at our institute in April 2008-March 2016. We investigated the endoscopic features and compared the clinical characteristics between the patients with and without upper gastrointestinal lesions. Forty-two patients (19.4%) had upper gastrointestinal lesions, including multiple erosions (n=18), bamboo joint-like appearance (n=17), mucosa with white spots (n=4), friable mucosa (n=2), ulcer (n=1), and purulent deposits within the mucosa (n=1) in the stomach and/or duodenum. Compared to the patients without upper gastrointestinal lesions, those with upper gastrointestinal lesions showed significantly more frequent extraintestinal manifestations (19.0% vs. 8.0%, p<0.05) and a significant history of colectomy (33.3% vs. 12.1%, p<0.01). There were no significant differences with regard to the sex ratio, age at esophagogastroduodenoscopy, gastrointestinal symptoms, time since the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, type of colitis at the initial diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, or gastric atrophy between the groups. In conclusion, gastroduodenal lesions were identified in 19.4% of the patients with ulcerative colitis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is particularly recommended for ulcerative colitis patients who show extraintestinal manifestations and for those who have undergone a colectomy.
キーワード ulcerative colitis esophagogastroduodenoscopy gastritis
Amo Type Original Article
発行日 2018-04
出版物タイトル Acta Medica Okayama
72巻
2号
出版者 Okayama University Medical School
開始ページ 105
終了ページ 113
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
資料タイプ 学術雑誌論文
言語 English
著作権者 CopyrightⒸ 2018 by Okayama University Medical School
論文のバージョン publisher
査読 有り
PubMed ID 29674758
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/55849
フルテキストURL 72_2_99.pdf
著者 Sugihara, Yuusaku| Harada, Keita| Kato, Ryo| Yamauchi, Kenji| Takashima, Shiho| Takei, Daisuke| Yamasaki, Yasushi| Inokuchi, Toshihiro| Takahara, Masahiro| Hiraoka, Sakiko| Okada, Hiroyuki|
抄録 Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for treatment of esophageal motility disorders has recently been reported to be highly effective and less invasive than other treatment. POEM was recently introduced in Okayama University Hospital under the supervision of a physician from a high-volume center. To verify the safety and efficacy of POEM during its introduction in our institution. We examined 10 cases in whom POEM was performed between January 2016 and April 2017. The patients included 7 men and 3 women, with a median age (range) of 49 years (17-74) and median symptom duration of 6 years (1-21). Seven patients had a straight esophagus, and the remaining 3 had a sigmoid esophagus. According to the Chicago classification, 6 patients were diagnosed with type I achalasia, 2 with type II achalasia, and 2 with distal esophagus spasm. Treatment outcomes and adverse events were evaluated. Treatment success was defined as a > 3 decrease in Eckardt score or a score of <3 at the time of discharge. The treatment success rate was 90%, with the average Eckardt score decreasing significantly, from 4.7 to 0.9 (p<0.05). No mucosal perforation, severe infection, mediastinitis, severe bleeding, or gastroesophageal reflux occurred intraoperatively or postoperatively. POEM was introduced to Okayama University Hospital, and the first 10 cases were accomplished safely and effectively under the supervision of an expert physician from a high-volume center.
キーワード achalasia Eckardt score peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM)
Amo Type Original Article
発行日 2018-04
出版物タイトル Acta Medica Okayama
72巻
2号
出版者 Okayama University Medical School
開始ページ 99
終了ページ 104
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
資料タイプ 学術雑誌論文
言語 English
著作権者 CopyrightⒸ 2018 by Okayama University Medical School
論文のバージョン publisher
査読 有り
PubMed ID 29674757
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/55584
フルテキストURL 71_6_475.pdf
著者 Takei, Daisuke| Harada, Keita| Takashima, Shiho| Inokuchi, Toshihiro| Nakarai, Asuka| Sugihara, Yusaku| Takahara, Masanobu| Hiraoka, Sakiko| Okada, Hiroyuki|
抄録 Several reports discussed colonoscopic surveillance after polypectomy and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for colorectal polyps, but only a few reports focused on prognostic analyses, and none involved metachronous neoplasia after colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). We conducted the present study to assess the risk of adenoma recurrence requiring endoscopic treatment, and to establish appropriate post-ESD colonoscopic surveillance. We enrolled 116 patients who had undergone colorectal ESD at Okayama University Hospital between February 2008 and July 2014 and had been followed-up >12 months. We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathological features of 101 lesions from 101 patients. Metachronous adenomas were detected in 21 cases (20.8%). We divided the patients into 2 groups according to the occurrence of metachronous adenomas. Our comparison of clinicopathological characteristics between these groups showed that in the metachronous adenomas group the number of synchronous adenomas at index colonoscopy was high and the rate of laterally spreading tumor-nongranular (LST-NG) was higher. A multivariate analysis indicated that the number of synchronous adenomas was significantly associated with metachronous adenomas (HR: 2.54, 95%CI: 1.04-6.52, p<0.05). The colonoscopic surveillance planning after colorectal ESD should be more meticulous for patients with more synchronous adenomas.
キーワード endoscopic submucosal dissection laterally spreading tumor metachronous recurrence local recurrence post-ESD colonoscopic surveillance
Amo Type Original Article
発行日 2017-12
出版物タイトル Acta Medica Okayama
71巻
6号
出版者 Okayama University Medical School
開始ページ 475
終了ページ 483
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
資料タイプ 学術雑誌論文
言語 English
著作権者 CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
論文のバージョン publisher
査読 有り
PubMed ID 29276220